Tag Archive: wrasses


TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes  (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae  (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Halichoeres richmondi

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: They have stunning horizontal chain like stripes going down the full length of their bodies. Male Richmond’s Wrasses tend to be more blue and green in color while females are more orange. Juvenile Richmond’s Wrasses have eye spots on their dorsal fins as well.

Length up to 17 cm (6.7 inches)

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Richmond’s Wrasse are found in the Western Pacific from Java to the Philippines inhabiting shallow lagoons and coral reefs, up to a depth of at least 20 m (65.5 feet).

REPRODUCTION: Pair during spawning

REMARKS: Wrasses are most easily identified by their pointed snouts and prominent canine teeth that protrude in front of the jaw. Other common characteristics include their form of propulsion, which depends mostly on the winglike motion of the pectoral fins with only an occasional burst of speed provided by the caudal fin.

CONSERVATION: IUCN least concern.

References

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/35513954125/in/album-72157629304397467/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium Animal Attractions Rich Ross 2017

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-YM

fishbase www.fishbase.se/summary/Halichoeres-richmondi.html

IUCN www.iucnredlist.org/details/187507/0

EOL eol.org/pages/212051/details

 

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Cirrhilabrus rubrimarginatus

 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Body shape is fusiform. The male is more brilliantly colored compared to the female and the juvenile, Has a red margin on both the tail and dorsal fin.

length up to 5 inchesRed-Margin Wrasse

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Western Pacific: north to the Ryukyu Islands, through the Philippines, Palau, and Indonesia. Adults found in deep coastal to outer reef drop-offs and steep slopes to 40 m (130 feet) or more, usually in loose aggregations.

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Least concern.

REMARKS: Fairy wrasses, along with 4 other closely related genera, have an unusual eye structure. The cornea is divided into two segments, basically forming a double pupil. It is theorized that the center pupil acts like a close-up lens to give the fish a clear view of its small prey. Fairy wrasses are active during the day, and sleep at night wedged into crevasses protected by a mucous cocoon they secrete around themselves.

References

California Academy of Sciences Philippine coral reef 2016      Charles Delbeek, M.Sc  Assistant Curator, Steinhart Aquarium  California Academy of Sciences

Ron’s WordPress shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1en

Ron’s flickr www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/13277420973/in/set-7215…

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/Cirrhilabrus-rubrimarginatus.html

EOL eol.org/pages/213476/hierarchy_entries/44698464/details

Reef Keeping  http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-01/hcs3/

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Halichoeres chloropterus

13392429345_0df197f614_b

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Juveniles lime green; females pale green above and white below, with a thin dark line on the base of the pectoral fin. Terminal males head of male with intricate reticulate pattern of bands that varies from one individual to another; small blackish spot on anus.

Length up to 19 cm (7.5 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: West Central Pacific: Philippines to the Great Barrier Reef. Found in shallow protected coral reef on silt, sand and rubble bottom. Depth to 10 meters (33 feet)

Pastel-green wrasse4391731072_b36a014eca_b

DIET IN THE WILD: Hard-shelled prey, including mollusks, crustaceans, and sea urchins.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least concern.

References

California Academy of Sciences Philippine coral reef 201

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3332103036/in/set-72157608208133134/

Ron’s WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1eI

fishbase: www.fishbase.org/summary/Halichoeres-chloropterus.html

EOL eol.org/pages/223761/details

 

 

TAXONOMY

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Subphylum: Vertebrata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Labridae: (Wrasses)


Genus/species;   Choerodon fasciatus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: 
C. fasciatus 
has vertical, broad, bright orange bands interspersed with blue bands. The caudal peduncle is black,  tail is white and dorsal as well as pelvic fins are orange. As it ages the back half of the body darkens to a dark blue/purple color. The mouth has large blue teeth is a very distinctive feature. 

Length up to 30 cm (12 in).

13468909953_41792a2c76_k

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found in the Western Pacific among seaward reefs, 5–35 m (15-100 ft). Usually solitary.

DIET IN THE WILD:
 Tuskfish have protruding canines used for moving rubble to expose invertebrate prey and prying mollusks from the substrate. Hard shelled prey crushed by pharyngeal teeth. Eats mollusks, echinoderms, crustaceans, worms.

REPRODUCTION
 Pelagic spawners, initial males spawn in large groups; terminal males are usually territorial and pair
 spawn with females of their choice. Females change sex into males for their terminal phase.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least Concern

REMARKS: Wrasses are most easily identified by their pointed snouts and prominent canine teeth that protrude in front of the jaw. Other common characteristics include their form of propulsion, which depends mostly on the wing like motion of the pectoral fins with only an occasional burst of speed provided by the caudal fin. Color, markings and body shapes change during maturation.

References

California Academy of Sciences Philippine coral reef 2016

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/13468909953/in/album-72157608208133134/

Ron’s Wordpress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-BV

EOL  http://eol.org/pages/206009/details

fishbase   http://www.fishbase.org/summary/Choerodon-fasciatus.html

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Gomphosus varius

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Wrasses vary greatly in size and body shape. All have terminal mouths, prominent canines, thick lips, and a single continuous dorsal fin.

The Bird Wrasse common name refers to the fish’s long snout, which is said to resemble a bird’s beak. This species, like many wrasses, changes appearance as it matures. During the juvenile phase it is green above and white below. The snout is short. In the next phase, called the initial phase, most or all are females, and they are white with a black spot on each scale. The top of the snout is orange, and the caudal fin is black with a white border. 

During the terminal phase, a dominant male becomes blue-green. The caudal fin has a bright blue crest.

Length of males up to 30 cm (12 inches) Females to about 20 cm (8 inches)

Initial Phase below

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Hawaiian Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Australia. Found in lagoons and seaward reefs at depths 2–30 m (6-100 ft.).

DIET IN THE WILD: Unlike parrotfishes which scrape algae from rocks with fused beaks, most wrasses feed on hard-shelled invertebrates such as crabs, brittle stars and shrimps  They use scissored motions with protruding canines and crush with powerful pharyngeal teeth. 

REPRODUCTION: Anthias and most wrasses are protogynous hermaphrodites meaning they are born female but if a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often change into a male to take its place. On the other hand, clown anemonefish are protandrous hermaphrodites. This means that they mature as males and the largest one will change into a female when the resident female dies.

REMARKS: Like other wrasses, the bird wrasse can be recognized by its characteristic swimming pattern: the pectoral fins move up and down in a “flying” motion”.

Terminal phase below

References

California Academy of Sciences Philippine coral reef 2016

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3751456858/in/album-72157625992053826/

Australian Museum http://australianmuseum.net.au/Birdnose-Wrasse-Gomphosus-varius

EOL  http://eol.org/pages/224889/details

Ron’s WordPress shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-K8

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Labroides dimidiatu

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Length to 11.5 cm (4.5 inches). Elongate body, tubular mouth. Blue to yellow above fading to white or yellow below. There is a black stripe from the eye to the caudal fin margin. The stripe widens posteriorly.

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Indo-Pacific in virtually all coral reef habitats: inner lagoons and subtidal reef flats to seaward reefs, 0.5-40 m (18 in to 125 ft), typically near branching corals. Active diurnally. Aggressively territorial. Nocturnally retires to small crevices in the reef, enclosing itself in a mucus cocoon. Remains in stations where other fish come to be cleaned.

DIET: The most common cleaner wrasse on reefs. Pick external parasites from other fishes. Also clean the wounds of other fishes by removing scar tissue. Clean the gills and even enter the mouth of the host.

REPRODUCTION: Monogamous. A protogynous hermaphrodite.
Open water/substratum egg scatterers, non guarders.

CONSERVATION: IUCN, Least concern

Cleaner Wrasse13298334135_9737aa3d26_b

Philippine Coral Reef PR04

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608208133134/with/2977676226/

WordPress Shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-Kp

fishbase fishbase.sinica.edu.tw/summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=5459

EOL eol.org/pages/204814/details

Australia Museum  australianmuseum.net.au/Common-Cleanerfish-Labroides-dimi…

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Thalassoma hardwicke

Sixbar Wrasse8410603333_678203e399_b

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Adult is pastel blue to pale green with six dark, vertical bars on their body, the last two saddling the tail. The head has a distinct ‘daisy’ print around the eyes made of a few different pastel colors (e.g., pink bands radiating from the eye) in larger adults.  Max length: 20 cm (7.9 in).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found in the tropical Indo-Pacific in shallow lagoons and seaward reefs. Depth to 15 m (50 ft.).

DIET IN THE WILD: Carnivore on benthic and planktonic crustaceans, invertebrates and small fishes.

Sixbar Wrasse8393609669_e1f3601c7c_b

REPRODUCTION: Protogynous hermaphrodite; Hermaphroditism occurs when a given individual in a species possesses both male and female reproductive organs, or can alternate between possessing first one, and then the other. The most common pattern is for a female to change into a male (protogyny). This often happens when a large dominant male is removed by a predator. Within a few days, the largest female in the harem becomes a dominant male and takes over the missing male’s function. This pattern is common in coral reef fishes, such as parrotfishes, wrasses, and groupers.
T.hardwicke is a pelagic spawner meaning water currents widely disperse the young. The eggs, embryos and larvae of pelagic spawners contain oil globules or have a high water content. As a result, they are buoyant and are widely dispersed by currents. The downside is that mortality is high, because they can be eaten so easily by pelagic predators. Pelagic spawners who live in or around coral reefs can spawn a small number of eggs almost daily over a period of months.

CONSERVATION: IUCN; least concern

REMARKS. Occur in small, loose groups.

References

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/4390962019/in/set-72157608208133134/

WordPress shortlink wp.me/p1DZ4b-nD

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/Thalassoma-hardwicke.html

EOL eol.org/pages/220102/details

TAXONOMY
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes) 
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Cirrhilabrus solorensis

Cirrhilabrus solorensis3380013623_6c8c3e586c_b

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Highly variable. The eye is bright red. Males usually have a dark band along the end of the gill covering. Change color and sex with growth. Females are able to change sex into an often brilliantly colored terminal male phase. Max. size: 11 cm (4.3 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found in the Western Central Pacific and Indonesia. in coastal to outer reef lagoons on rubble and coral habitats.

DIET IN THE WILD: Zooplankton.

Cirrhilabrus solorensis3813060378_a4f75890b9_b

REMARKS: The cornea of the eye of fairy wrasses is divided into two segments, essentially forming a double pupil. It is thought that the center pupil is a close-up lens that lets the fish have a magnified view of their small prey.

Philippine Coral Reef PR04

References:

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3380013623/in/set-72157608208133134/

WordPress shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1ef

fishbase www.fishbase.org/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=60815

EOL eol.org/pages/210468/details

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: (Labridae) Wrasses

Genus/speces: Halichoeres semicinctus

Rock Wrasse (male) below:

Rock Wrasse Male 3995256931_9e14b0f8ab_b

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Length to 38 cm (15 inches). Terminal phase males are characterized by a partial dark stripe behind yellow pectoral fins and pink eyes, while females and immature male rock wrasses are similar in appearance having ranging from brown to yellow to orange. 

Rock Wrasse (female or immature male) below:

Rock Wrasse (female or immature male)  3995255809_8f686dbab8_b

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Pt. Conception, California to Guadalupe Island off central Baja California, Mexico. Habitat: Close to rocks near patches of sand; tidepools and down to 24 m (79 feet).

DIET IN THE WILD: Small invertebrates, taken during the day.

REPRODUCTION: Each individual starts as female then changes to a male at length of about 30 cm. Pelagic spawners

CONSERVATION: IUCN: Least concern.

REMARKS : Sleeps at night buried in sand, with head protruding, and will dart to a sandy refuge during the day if startled.

Rock Wrasse (female or immature male) below:

Rock Wrasse (female or immature male)  2972940984_0ce80884d9_b

Southern California Kelp Tank CC14

WordPress Shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-Yk

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157633391356187/with/3995255809/

TAXONOMY
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Labridae (Wrasses)

Genus/species: Oxyjulis californica

Senorita Wrasse 3995255581_88e76a0033_b

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS Length to 10 inches (25 cm). Cigar-shaped fish with large scales and protruding teeth. Orange to brownish, a few are more pink or yellow. Large black marking at base of caudal fin.

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Salt Point, northern California to south-central Baja California. Habitat: Found in kelp and other seaweeds and over rocky reefs, usually at shallow depths. Five to 240 feet (1.5 m-76 m) deep.

DIET IN THE WILD: Hydroids, bryozoans, amphipods, parasitic copepods, and isopods

REMARKS: Popular in the aquarium trade. At night, señoritas seek out a nearby sandy area and bury themselves with a headfirst dive into the sand, ultimately sleeping with head protruding.
Señoritas cleaner fish. picking external parasites and copepods from the skin of other fishes.

Senorita Wrasse 3996018576_6967b7abb5_b-1

Southern California Kelp Exhibit CC14

WordPress Shortlink http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-Y8

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157633391356187/

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