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TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species; Sebastes miniatus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: They vary in color from bright red to orange-red with the sides mottled with gray. mouth and fins are red. The red fins usually are edged with black and 3 obscure stripes radiate from each eye. The caudal fin is slightly indented and the mouth is large, with the lower jaw slightly projecting. The vermilion rockfish has scales on the bottom of the lower jaw which make it rough to the touch.

Length up to 91.0 cm (36 inches)
Weight up to 15 pounds

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Eastern Pacific: British Columbia, Baja California, Mexico. Marine; Adults inhabit shallow to deep rocky reefs at depths of 100 to 500 feet, (has been taken from depths as great as 900 feet).

DIET IN THE WILD: Smaller fishes, squid and octopus. Most fishes that are eaten are other smaller kinds of rockfish.

REPRODUCTION: Viviparous. As with all other rockfish, fertilization is internal and the young are mobile with the free-swimming young feeding primarily upon shrimp–like organisms.

14808649413_7ea3b11ca2_k

LONGEVITY: live up to 22 years

REMARKS; Excellent food fish but does not keep well in the freezer

Color of Life note: Red color is the first to be filtered out as one depends deep into the ocean making this Vermillion rockfish hard to spot by predators.
Ref: California Academy of Sciences, Color of Life Exhibit 2015

References

Ron’s WordPress shortlink wp.me/p1DZ4b-EU

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

California Dept of Fish and Wildlife www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mspcont4.asp

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p 144

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press p 174

Ron’s flickr www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/7804218942/in/set-72157…

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/3982

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes constellatus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Elongate red-orange above, with 3–5 large whitish blotches on back; paler below. Small white dots cover most of the body.

Length up to 46 cm (18 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: San Francisco Cordell Bank south to Baja in coastal waters; usually on deep reefs at 24-275 m (80-900 ft)

REPRODUCTION:  As with other kinds of rockfish, fertilization is internal.  Viviparous (live young are born) with planktonic larvae and pelagic juveniles. 

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Not evaluated

REMARKS: Occasionally caught by sport fishers; considered highly flavorful.

“Sebastes contellatus” is latin for “magnificent starred”

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast  2017

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608333101710/with/2989047345/

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p 137

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press p 155

Ron’s WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-EM

fishbase:  www.fishbase.org/summary/3961

eol  http://eol.org/pages/203880/details

CA dept of fish and wildlife   www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mspcont4.asp#starry

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes rosaceus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: There are is a purple saddle behind the eyes and 4–5 whitish blotches bordered by purple are on the back. Sides are reddish with purple mottling on back, and whitish below.

Unlike the Starry Rockfish, the Rosy Rockfish is not covered with white dots. It is a relatively small rockfish; Length up to 11 inches (30 cm) long.

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Puget Sound to central Baja, but rare north of California. Bottom-dweller, usually between 30–45 m, (100-150 (feet) though occasionally deeper.

DIET IN THE WILD: Small fishes and crustaceans

REPRODUCTION: Livebearer.

REMARKS: Rosy rockfish hide under dark ledges during the day.

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Unknown

                                                                                                                                                                                                 
References: 

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3380840962/in/album-72157608359804936/

Vetted California Academy of Sciences,  MUpton@calacademy.org 2014

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Coastal Marine 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company.

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press pp 184-185

 

Ron’s WordPress shortlink: wp.me/p1DZ4b-ED

Monterey Bay Aquarium: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animal-guide/fishes/rosy-rockfish

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes serriceps

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS:  One of the most striking, unusually marked rockfishes, with 5-6 black bars over a yellowish to olive body and red lips and chin. Compact body with large head venomous spines.

NOTE: Other barred rockfishes are not yellow or olive.

IMG_8885

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT:  San Francisco to central Baja California Inhabiting areas with numerous caves, crevices and other protective recesses. They are solitary and territorial and usually found between 6–40 m (19-125 ft) a maximum depth of 45 m (190 ft).

DIET IN THE WILD: Most probably either crepuscular (feeding at dawn and dusk) or nighttime ambush predator, feeding on shrimp, crabs and small fishes.

REPRODUCTION: Viviparous, same as other Sebastes sp.

PREDATORS: Sharks, dolphins, and seals.

LONGEVITY: Live up to 25 years

REMARKS: S. serriceps is an important species in both the nearshore recreational fishery and in the commercial live fish fishery.

Serriceps means “saw head” in latin, referring to the large head spines. See below on this immature Treefish.

References

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/4689974860/in/set-72157608333101710/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 151

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 193-194

eol eol.org/pages/212870/details 

CA dept of fish and gamewww.dfg.ca.gov/marine/nearshorefinfish/treefish.asp

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1iR

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes rubrivinctus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: The body is deep, fusiform, compressed. Adult colored white-pinkish with 4 dark red-orange to reddish-brown bars across back and base of tail.

Length up to 64 cm (25 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: San Francisco, California, USA to Baja California, Mexico. Found at depths up to 300 m (900 ft). Adults typically solitary and shelter in and around rocks, large white sea anemones, ledge overhangs and in kelp.

DIET IN THE WILD: Benthic predators of crabs, hermit crabs, shrimps, fishes, and octopuses.

LONGEVITY: Live to at least 18 years.

REPRODUCTION: Fertilization internal. Livebearer.

CONSERVATION: 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species.

REMARKS: A popular sport fish. Sebastes is Greek for “magnificent.” Rubrivinctus is formed from 2 Latin words that translate as “red banded.”

References

Ron’s flickr    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608359804936/with/3505702397/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast  2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p, 149

fishbase www.fishbase.ca/summary/3997

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 188-189

eol eol.org/pages/211626/details

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-E7

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus:species: Sebastes flavidus

 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS:  Olive green to greenish brown with some light mottling dorsally, light ventrally; fins yellowish-green, ventral fins often tinged in orange and edged with pink.  

Max length 66 cm (26 inches) Max weight 2.5 kg (5.5 pounds).

Juvenile photo below.  Juveniles found around floats and pilings.

Juvenile YellowTail Rockfish14290356927_6f6345d4de_k

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT:  Northeast Pacific: Alaska to San Diego, California. Forms schools in open water along steeply sloping shores or above rocky reefs; also amid cracks and crevices of the sea floor.

Depth 0-549 meters (0-1800 feet).

DIET IN THE WILDPelagic crustaceans, fishes and squids.

REPRODUCTION: S, flavidus viviparous. Females produce 56,000-1,993,000 eggs per season.

LONGEVITY: Age up to 64 years

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Not evaluated

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Ron’s flickr  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/7564720004/in/set-72157608359804936

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 140

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/Sebastes-flavidus.html

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 164-165

eol eol.org/pages/994489/details

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-F1

 

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes caurinus 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Deep, stout body. Color highly variable; dark brown or olive to pink or orange-red above, with patches of pink-copper and occasionally yellow.. Fins primarily copper, often dusky. They are distinguished from other rockfish species by the clear areas along the posterior two thirds of the lateral lines, and in having a whitish underside, usually with two dark bands radiating from eye. Dorsal fin membrane not deeply incised.

Length up to 57 cm (22.44 in). Weight up to 2.6 kg (5.73 pounds).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: The Copper Rockfish is found in the Gulf of Alaska to central Baja California among rock-sand bottoms 10–180m (33-600 ft) deep. They are solitary, bottom-dwelling reef fish which frequently live near pinnacles and wrecks. Adults avoid warm water; thus live deeper in southern California than further north.

DIET IN THE WILD: Juveniles consume plankton. Adults are mainly benthic (organisms living on or in sea or lake bottoms) feeder preying  upon fishes, crabs, mysid shrimp, prawns, amphipods, octopuses, polychaete worms and fish eggs.

REPRODUCTION: Mature at 4-8 years. Fertilization is internal. via copulation and the transfer of sperm is through a modified urogenital papilla on the male.
The females store sperm in the ovaries for several months until ovulation then fertilizes the eggs. They are viviparous. The larvae mature in shallow water.. Larvae are planktonic maturing in shallow water becoming sexually mature at around five years.

LONGEVITY: Live to at least 55 years.

PREDATORS: Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) and also other large predators.

CONSERVATION: IUCN: No special status

REMARKS: Rockfish species that live in the California coastal waters, are very important to commercial and sport fisheries. The 60 species of rockfish caught account for 34% by weight of all sportfish landed in California.
Copper Rockfish caught off the coast of British Columbia and California are sold alive at a premium price to Asian fish markets.

References

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/36594603820/in/album-72157608359804936/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 136

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/3957

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 152-153

Animal Diversity Web (U. of Michigan) animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Sebastes_caurinus/

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink wp.me/p1DZ4b-Dx

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom:  Animalia
Phylum:  Chordata
Class:  Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order:  Scorpaeniformes  (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family:  Sebastidae    (Rockfishes, Rockcods, and Thornyheads)

Genus/species:   Sebastes nebulosus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Body blue or black, mottled with yellow with some individuals being white ventrally. A broad yellow stripe from about the 3rd dorsal spine runs into or along the lateral line. Pelvic, anal and caudal fins are dark.

Length up to 45 cm (18 in), weight to 1.7 kg (3.75 lbs)

 

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Southeast Alaska to Southern California. Lives among rocky shores along exposed coasts to depths of 3–138 m (10-450 ft). S. nebulosus lurks solitarily in caverns and among crevices, resting  benthically on their fins. They Often remain on their “homesite” for many years.

DIET IN THE WILD: Preys upon fishes, crustaceans (including amphipods, crabs and shrimps), brittlestars and mollusks (including gastropods, squid and octopuses).

REPRODUCTION: Fertilization internal

MORTALITY: Can live to at least 79 years

CONSERVATION: IUCN, Not evaluated

REMARKS: One of the tastiest rockfishes, but infrequently in markets because it is rarely caught. All rockfishes have venomous spines on dorsal, pectoral and anal fins. Not so toxic as scorpionfishes venom, but still capable of inflicting a painful sting. Sebastes is Greek for “magnificent.” Nebulosus is Latin for “clouded.”

References:

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, U.S.A. 336 p.

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

fishbase: www.fishbase.org/summary/3984

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg 177-178

Ron’s flickr   http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608333101710/

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-Bk

eol eol.org/pages/209609/details

 

 

California Coast CC06

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes auriculatus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Light brown mottled with dark brown; a dark blotch on upper portion of opercle, Fins are dusky-pink. The underside of throat and lower jaw are pinkish.  The rear area of the gill cover (opercule) with the prominent dark patch probably inspired its Latin name auriculatus, meaning eared.

Length up to 56 cm 22 inches

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Southern Baja California to the northern Gulf of Alaska. Brown Rockfish are commonly found as bottom dwellers from shallow subtidal waters 20 ft. (6 m) to 444 ft. (135 m).

DIET IN THE WILD: Small fishes, crab, shrimp, and other small invertebrates.

REPRODUCTION: Viviparous, with planktonic larvae and pelagic juveniles. All are mature at 15 inches or 5 years of age.

LONGEVITY: Up to 34 years

REMARKS: Fin spines are sharp and mildly venomous and can cause annoying wounds.

Small live specimens make excellent bait for large lingcod. Flesh is firm and tasty, but rarely found in markets

References

Ron’s flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/35972127564/in/dateposted-public/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Coastal Marine 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p.134

 fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/Sebastes-auriculatus

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 146-148

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-Da

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes paucispinis

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: The long jaw which extends to the eye socket is distinctive. Adults’ backs range in color from olive to burnt-orange with pink & red stomachs. Juveniles are light bronze with small brown spots on their sides. Coloring darkens and spots disappear as they mature.

World record: 90 cm (35 in), 9.5 kg (20 lbs)

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found from Alaska to Baja California in almost all habitats. Bocaccio rockfish from age 1 – 3 years are relatively pelagic becoming more demersal (bottom oriented) as they age. Oil platforms are now a somewhat important artificial habitat for the species.

Depth: 40 – 300 m (130 – 980 ft)

DIET IN THE WILD: The Bocaccio Rockfish is a voracious carnivore of other fishes including rockfishes.

TAXONOMY Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads) Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads) Genus/species: Sebastes paucispinis5426914107_560c411740_b

REPRODUCTION: Maturity occurs at 4–5 years of age. S. paucispinis are viviparous like all rockfishes, with internal fertilization and embryo development. Females give birth to live larval young.

LONGEVITY: up to 30-50 years.

 

PREDATORS; Seabirds feed on juveniles. Marine mammals are common predators of adults.

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Critically Endangered due to overfishing using trawling and gill netting which was curtailed in 1998. Because the species is slow-growing and late maturing, recovery will take many years. These fish are still being caught as bycatch in other fisheries.

REMARKS: Great sport fish and good eating. Like many rockfish species, the spines of Bocaccio can be mildly poisonous and cause unpleasant pain if you are unlucky enough to get poked by one!

References

Ron’s flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/7805276558/in/album-72157608359804936/

Pacific Coast Fishes Eschmeyer and Herald 1983 Easton Press page 145

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Coastal Marine 2017

fishbasewww.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=3987&A… bokacio

 eol eol.org/pages/209611/details

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg 179-182

WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/bottomfish/identification/rockfish/s_paucispinis.html

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink wp.me/p1DZ4b-D6

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