Category: ANGELFISHES


TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/Species:  Pomacanthus navarchus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Bright yellow to orange body and face, contrasted with intense deep beautiful blues. It’s named for its color pattern which suggests a girdled appearance that is strengthened with outlines of vibrant neon blues.

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Length up to 29.97 cm (11.8 inches)

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Indo Pacific Ocean from the Maldives to Vanuatu then northward to the Yaeyama Islands and it is also found in Palau and Krosae in Micronesia. They inhabit areas with heavy coral growth such as clear lagoons, protected outer reef slopes, and channels.  Depth range 3 – 40 m.

DIET IN THE WILD: Omnivore, sponges and tunicates are their main food but also fond of algae.

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REPRODUCTION: Hermaphroditic, visibly you cannot tell the difference between males and females.

Longevity: 15 years in the wild.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Red List: LC – Least Concern.

REMARKS: P. navarchus secretes a type of mucus, or slime, from their skin providing protection against parasites and infections and helps it move faster.

References

California Academy of Sciences Philippine coral reef 2016

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1cu

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157606840726733/

fishbase  http://fishbase.org/summary/Pomacanthus-navarchus.html

EOL  http://eol.org/pages/994430/details

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Genicanthus lamarck

Genicanthus lamarck 3193591354_41bdf27969_b

female above

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Sexually dimorphic; white or silver body with horizontal black stripes from eye to speckled lyre tails. Females have bolder stripes, one extending into the tail. Males have a yellow spot on the forehead, longer more pointed caudal fin and jet black pelvic fins; females’, white.

Maximum length: 25 cm (10 in)

male below

Genicanthus lamarck 25852806440_d352c49ff6_k

 

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Indo-Pacific reef dweller. They prefer the top to middle of their depth range 15–35m, (30-100 ft) unlike most other angelfish.

DIET IN THE WILD: G. lamarck are also the only group of angelfish that feed on plankton.

REPRODUCTION: Males maintain harems, scatter pelagic eggs after mid-water mating rituals. The eggs and larvae drift, then settle onto the reef at the time of metamorphosis to the juvenile stage.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Red List Least concern (LC)

REMARKS: Males and females are so distinct the sexes were once considered separate species. One of the few angelfish to display sexual dimorphism. Their genus, Genicanthus, is distinctive among angelfish for their lyre tails, an adaptation to open water, fast swimming.

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium Philippine Coral Reef 2016

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  wp.me/p1DZ4b-1co

EOL eol.org/pages/218646/details

fishbase  fishbase.org/summary/6612

Ron’s flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3142850563/in/album-72157625992053826/

TAXONOMY
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class; Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Pomacanthus imperator

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Juveniles have concentric white circles, also distinguished by a white dorsal fin margin. The adult pattern emerges at about 10 cm (4 in): vivid. It has alternating yellow and blue stripes and yellow tail; blue edged eye mask, broad blue-edged black bar behind head. A long stout preopercular spine is present on the gill cover that is common to angelfishes. 

 Length to 40 cm (16 in).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Indo-Pacific.  Juveniles are solitary found under ledges and holes of outer lagoon patch reefs or semiprotected areas of exposed channels and reef flats. Adults occur near ledges and caves in regions of robust coral growth on clear lagoon, channel or seaward reefs to 70 m. Adults typically in male/female pair or solitary.

DIET IN THE WILD: P. imperator feed on sponges and other encrusting organisms such as tunicates. Young and adults may clean much larger fishes such as sunfish.

REPRODUCTION:  Males will have 2 or more females in their harem.  The male meets the female several times at the same spot before rising.The spawning ascent  is upwards for 3 – 9 meters. The male stays with the female for a while after swimming down from the rise and then departs across the reef (probably after the next female. The larvae float in a planktonic stage for a few weeks before turning into fry.

LONGEVITY: More than 5 years in captivity.

CONSERVATION: IUCN: Least concern.

REMARKS: When alarmed, can produce low-frequency drumlike noises that are loud enough to startle divers.  Young and adults may clean much larger fishes such as sunfish.

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium Philippine coral reef 2016

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3308685675/in/set-72157606840726733/

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-nq

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/6504

Arkive www.arkive.org/emperor-angelfish/pomacanthus-imperator/

Australian Museum  australianmuseum.net.au/Emperor-Angelfish-Pomacanthus-imp…


TAXONOMY
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Centropyge loricula

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Typically bright orange-red color;black blotch near the head and 4–5 black bars across the body; flaring caudal fin about half the body height. Orange-red dorsal and anal fins tipped in alternating purple-blue and black bands. Males are brighter and larger than females.

Max. length: 15 cm (6 in).

Centropyge loricula14041213549_e949c9ebca_k

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found among tropical lagoons and coral reefs of the Indian and Pacific Ocean. Depth from 15–60 m (45-180 ft).

DIET IN THE WILD: The Flame Angelfish feeds on algae and marine invertebrates associated with coral reefs.

REPRODUCTION: Like angelfish in general, this species begins life undifferentiated sexually, changes into females, and may develop into males with one or more females in a territorial harem. After a short mating ritual, male and female(s) rise in the water column to shed and fertilize gametes that develop within the plankton.

PREDATORS: C. loricula is preyed upon by many reef fishes.

IMG_0865

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least concern.

REMARKS: Members of the genus Centropyge are the dwarf or pygmy angelfishes. Territorial males may determine dominance by grappling with interlocked jaws, a behavior humans sometimes mistake for a fishy kiss.

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium Philippine coral reef 2016

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/14041213549/in/album-72157625992053826/

Ron’s WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1c8

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/7814

EOL eol.org/pages/219464/details

Animal Diversity web animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Centropyge_loricu…

Taken on 1-28-14, 9-11-12,

TAXONOMY
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Holacanthus tricolor

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Like their close relatives the butterflyfishes, they have a deep, laterally compressed body, a single and a unnotched dorsal fin. The most observable difference between the two families is the long spine at the corner of the preopercle common to angelfishes.

H. tricolor has a yellow anterior body with the remaining parts of body black. The caudal fin is entirely yellow.
Maximum length of approximately 12 inches (35 cm)

IMG_7406

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Western Atlantic: Georgia (USA), Bermuda, and northern Gulf of Mexico to Santa Catarina, Brazil among rock jetties, rocky reefs and rich coral areas.    Depth range 3 – 92 m (10-300 ft)

DIET IN THE WILD: Feeds on tunicates, sponges, zoantharians and algae.

IMG_7386

REPRODUCTION/DEVELOPMENT: Pair bonding suggests a monogamous relationship. Pairs usually consist of one small and one large fish as well. Pairs will spawn by slowly rising up in the water column while bringing their bellies close together, and releasing large amounts of eggs and sperm. A female can release anywhere from 25 to 75 thousand eggs each evening. This can total as many as ten million eggs for the duration of the spawning cycle. The eggs are transparent and pelagic, floating in the water column hatching in 15 to 20 hours becoming “pre-larval” angelfish attached to their large yolk sac. Has no functional fins, no eyes, or gut. After about 48 hours the yolk is absorbed developing into true larvae feeding on plankton. Growth is rapid and 3 to 4 weeks after hatching the fish will reach about 15-20 mm (0.6-0.8in) and will settle on the bottom.

CONSERVATION: IUCN  Least Concern

REMARKS: Reports of ciguatera poisoning 

References

California Academy of Sciences, Steinhart Aquarium, Caribbean reef fishes 2015

Ron’s flickr  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/7066935367/in/set-72157606840726733/

Ron’s WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1bS

fishbase  www.fishbase.org/summary/3610

EOL  eol.org/pages/995079/hierarchy_entries/44730320/details

Animal World  animal-world.com/encyclo/marine/angels/RockBeauty.php

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class : Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Pectiformes (Perch-likes)
Family : Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Centropyge argi

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Like their close relatives the butterflyfishes, they have a deep, laterally compressed body, a single, unnotched dorsal fin, and a small mouth with brushlike teeth. The most observable difference between the two families is the long spine at the corner of the preopercle common to angelfishes.

C. argi is a small, oval angelfish. The body is dark blue with a yellow-orange face and blue ring around the eye. Pectoral fins are pale yellowish; other fins deep blue with pale blue margins.
Length up to 8 cm (3.1 in)

 

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DISTRIBUTION/ HABITAT: Bermuda, Florida, Bahamas, Yucatan and Central American coast to Guianas. Nocturnally active in pairs or small groups in rubble areas near rocky or coral reefs, occasionally walls. 

Depth 9–105 m (30-345 ft), commonly deeper than 30 m (100 ft)

DIET IN THE WILD: Omnivorous, feeds on algae, benthic inverts and detritus.

REPRODUCTION/DEVELOPMENT: Broadcast spawners. All Centropyge are born female. As they grow, the larger and more dominant fish will become male and the others will remain female. If the male dies, the next in command in the hierarchy will turn to male.

PREDATORS: Preyed on by other fish such as yellow-finned tunafish. This small angelfsh darts into crevices when frightened or pursued by predators.

Lifespan: Have been reported to live up to 5 years in captivity.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least concern.

CaribbeanReef 

References

California Academy of Sciences, Steinhart Aquarium, Caribbean reef fishes 2015

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157606840726733/

Ron’s W0rdpress shortlink   http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-uJ

fishbase  http://www.fishbase.org/summary/3607

Book  Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p.

ADW  http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Centropyge_argi/

 


TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii  (ray-finned fishes) Order:
Perciformes  (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae  (Angelfishes)  

Genus/species:  Holacanthus ciliaris  

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Like their close relatives the butterflyfishes, they have a deep, laterally compressed body, a single, unnotched dorsal fin, and a small mouth with brushlike teeth.  The most observable difference between the two families is the long spine at the corner of the preopercle common to angelfishes.

H. ciliaris  is deep-bodied and strongly laterally compressed. Dorsal and anal fins trail. Juveniles have vertical blue bands on an orange-red body. As the fish grows, the bars increase in number before gradually disappearing. The color of large adults is purplish blue with yellow-orange rims to the scales; head above eye dark blue. They have a distinctive “crown” is speckled dark blue and surrounded by a ring of bright blue. Length to 45 cm (18 in), weight to 1.6 kg (3.5lbs).  

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Found in Bermuda, Florida, Bahamas, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico to Brazil on offshore reefs, 2-70+ m (6-200+ ft). Travel solitary or in pairs among sea fans, sea whips and corals.  

DIET IN THE WILD: Adults feed primarily on sponges; also algae, tunicates, hydroids and bryozoans. Juveniles glean ectoparasites from other fish.  

Queen Angelfish

REPRODUCTION: Pairs reproduce bringing their bellies close together, and release sperm and 25 to 75 thousand eggs (10 million per spawning cycle).  The eggs are transparent, buoyant, and pelagic hatching after 15 to 20 hours into larvae with the yolk sac being absorbed after 48 hours.  The larvae then develop normal characteristics of free swimming fish feeding on plankton and about 3–4 weeks after hatching the 15–20 millimetres (0.6–0.8 in) long juvenile settles on the bottom. Juveniles  are found among colonies of finger sponges and corals at the bottom of reefs for protection.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least concern

 

References

California Academy of Sciences, Steinhart Aquarium, Caribbean reef fishes 2015

fishbase  http://www.fishbase.org/summary/3609

ADW  http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Holacanthus_ciliaris/

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157625866509117/

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-AV

 

TAXONOMY
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Perciformes (Perch-likes)
Family: Pomacanthidae (Angelfishes)

Genus/species: Pygoplites diacanthus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Identified by 7 or 8 dark edged bluish-white bars that run horizontally down its body. Its body is yellow with blue coloration on the rear of the dorsal fin and it has a small dark patch over its eye. It has a strong preopercular spine. The anal fin has yellow and blue stripes. Juveniles are similarly colored to adults except for a large false eye-spot at the base of the dorsal fin. This fades as the fish matures and it’s gone by the time the fish reaches a length of 6-7 cm. The maximum adult size is reported to be between 20 and 30 cm (8 and 12 inches).

Regal Angelfish Pygoplites diacanthus

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: P. diacanthus is found throughout the Northern and Western Indian Ocean, the Red Sea, and the Indo- Pacific Ocean. They are commonly observed as solitary individuals and in pairs and never stray far from a reef crevice. The maximum adult size is reported to be between 20 and 30 cm (8 and 12 inches).
They are always on the move swimming from crevice to crevice in search of food. Found at depths from 1-20 meters (3-66 ft.)

DIET IN THE WILD: Sponges and tunicates.

CONSERVATION: IUCN Least concerned.

Location: Water planet coral exhibit WP33

References

flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157606840726733/

WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-xt

Australian Museum australianmuseum.net.au/Regal-Angelfish-Pygoplites-diacan…

fishbase fishbase.sinica.edu.tw/summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=6572


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