Archive for September, 2017


TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes constellatus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Elongate red-orange above, with 3–5 large whitish blotches on back; paler below. Small white dots cover most of the body.

Length up to 46 cm (18 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: San Francisco Cordell Bank south to Baja in coastal waters; usually on deep reefs at 24-275 m (80-900 ft)

REPRODUCTION:  As with other kinds of rockfish, fertilization is internal.  Viviparous (live young are born) with planktonic larvae and pelagic juveniles. 

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Not evaluated

REMARKS: Occasionally caught by sport fishers; considered highly flavorful.

“Sebastes contellatus” is latin for “magnificent starred”

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast  2017

Ron’s flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608333101710/with/2989047345/

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p 137

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press p 155

Ron’s WordPress shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-EM

fishbase:  www.fishbase.org/summary/3961

eol  http://eol.org/pages/203880/details

CA dept of fish and wildlife   www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mspcont4.asp#starry

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes rosaceus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: There are is a purple saddle behind the eyes and 4–5 whitish blotches bordered by purple are on the back. Sides are reddish with purple mottling on back, and whitish below.

Unlike the Starry Rockfish, the Rosy Rockfish is not covered with white dots. It is a relatively small rockfish; Length up to 11 inches (30 cm) long.

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: Puget Sound to central Baja, but rare north of California. Bottom-dweller, usually between 30–45 m, (100-150 (feet) though occasionally deeper.

DIET IN THE WILD: Small fishes and crustaceans

REPRODUCTION: Livebearer.

REMARKS: Rosy rockfish hide under dark ledges during the day.

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Unknown

                                                                                                                                                                                                 
References: 

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/3380840962/in/album-72157608359804936/

Vetted California Academy of Sciences,  MUpton@calacademy.org 2014

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Coastal Marine 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company.

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press pp 184-185

 

Ron’s WordPress shortlink: wp.me/p1DZ4b-ED

Monterey Bay Aquarium: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animal-guide/fishes/rosy-rockfish

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes serriceps

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS:  One of the most striking, unusually marked rockfishes, with 5-6 black bars over a yellowish to olive body and red lips and chin. Compact body with large head venomous spines.

NOTE: Other barred rockfishes are not yellow or olive.

IMG_8885

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT:  San Francisco to central Baja California Inhabiting areas with numerous caves, crevices and other protective recesses. They are solitary and territorial and usually found between 6–40 m (19-125 ft) a maximum depth of 45 m (190 ft).

DIET IN THE WILD: Most probably either crepuscular (feeding at dawn and dusk) or nighttime ambush predator, feeding on shrimp, crabs and small fishes.

REPRODUCTION: Viviparous, same as other Sebastes sp.

PREDATORS: Sharks, dolphins, and seals.

LONGEVITY: Live up to 25 years

REMARKS: S. serriceps is an important species in both the nearshore recreational fishery and in the commercial live fish fishery.

Serriceps means “saw head” in latin, referring to the large head spines. See below on this immature Treefish.

References

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/4689974860/in/set-72157608333101710/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 151

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 193-194

eol eol.org/pages/212870/details 

CA dept of fish and gamewww.dfg.ca.gov/marine/nearshorefinfish/treefish.asp

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-1iR

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes rubrivinctus

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: The body is deep, fusiform, compressed. Adult colored white-pinkish with 4 dark red-orange to reddish-brown bars across back and base of tail.

Length up to 64 cm (25 inches).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: San Francisco, California, USA to Baja California, Mexico. Found at depths up to 300 m (900 ft). Adults typically solitary and shelter in and around rocks, large white sea anemones, ledge overhangs and in kelp.

DIET IN THE WILD: Benthic predators of crabs, hermit crabs, shrimps, fishes, and octopuses.

LONGEVITY: Live to at least 18 years.

REPRODUCTION: Fertilization internal. Livebearer.

CONSERVATION: 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species.

REMARKS: A popular sport fish. Sebastes is Greek for “magnificent.” Rubrivinctus is formed from 2 Latin words that translate as “red banded.”

References

Ron’s flickr    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/sets/72157608359804936/with/3505702397/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast  2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p, 149

fishbase www.fishbase.ca/summary/3997

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 188-189

eol eol.org/pages/211626/details

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-E7

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus:species: Sebastes flavidus

 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS:  Olive green to greenish brown with some light mottling dorsally, light ventrally; fins yellowish-green, ventral fins often tinged in orange and edged with pink.  

Max length 66 cm (26 inches) Max weight 2.5 kg (5.5 pounds).

Juvenile photo below.  Juveniles found around floats and pilings.

Juvenile YellowTail Rockfish14290356927_6f6345d4de_k

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT:  Northeast Pacific: Alaska to San Diego, California. Forms schools in open water along steeply sloping shores or above rocky reefs; also amid cracks and crevices of the sea floor.

Depth 0-549 meters (0-1800 feet).

DIET IN THE WILDPelagic crustaceans, fishes and squids.

REPRODUCTION: S, flavidus viviparous. Females produce 56,000-1,993,000 eggs per season.

LONGEVITY: Age up to 64 years

CONSERVATION: IUCN; Not evaluated

References

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Ron’s flickr  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/7564720004/in/set-72157608359804936

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 140

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/Sebastes-flavidus.html

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 164-165

eol eol.org/pages/994489/details

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink  http://wp.me/p1DZ4b-F1

 

 

TAXONOMY
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
Order: Scorpaeniformes (Scorpionfishes and flatheads)
Family: Sebastidae (Rockfishes, rockcods and thornyheads)

Genus/species: Sebastes caurinus 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS: Deep, stout body. Color highly variable; dark brown or olive to pink or orange-red above, with patches of pink-copper and occasionally yellow.. Fins primarily copper, often dusky. They are distinguished from other rockfish species by the clear areas along the posterior two thirds of the lateral lines, and in having a whitish underside, usually with two dark bands radiating from eye. Dorsal fin membrane not deeply incised.

Length up to 57 cm (22.44 in). Weight up to 2.6 kg (5.73 pounds).

DISTRIBUTION/HABITAT: The Copper Rockfish is found in the Gulf of Alaska to central Baja California among rock-sand bottoms 10–180m (33-600 ft) deep. They are solitary, bottom-dwelling reef fish which frequently live near pinnacles and wrecks. Adults avoid warm water; thus live deeper in southern California than further north.

DIET IN THE WILD: Juveniles consume plankton. Adults are mainly benthic (organisms living on or in sea or lake bottoms) feeder preying  upon fishes, crabs, mysid shrimp, prawns, amphipods, octopuses, polychaete worms and fish eggs.

REPRODUCTION: Mature at 4-8 years. Fertilization is internal. via copulation and the transfer of sperm is through a modified urogenital papilla on the male.
The females store sperm in the ovaries for several months until ovulation then fertilizes the eggs. They are viviparous. The larvae mature in shallow water.. Larvae are planktonic maturing in shallow water becoming sexually mature at around five years.

LONGEVITY: Live to at least 55 years.

PREDATORS: Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) and also other large predators.

CONSERVATION: IUCN: No special status

REMARKS: Rockfish species that live in the California coastal waters, are very important to commercial and sport fisheries. The 60 species of rockfish caught account for 34% by weight of all sportfish landed in California.
Copper Rockfish caught off the coast of British Columbia and California are sold alive at a premium price to Asian fish markets.

References

Ron’s flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cas_docents/36594603820/in/album-72157608359804936/

California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium California Rocky Coast 2017

Eschmeyer, W.N., E.S. Herald and H. Hammann, 1983. A field guide to Pacific coast fishes of North America. Boston (MA, USA): Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 136

fishbase www.fishbase.org/summary/3957

Probably More Than You Want To Know About The Fishes Of The Pacific Coast, Milton Love 1996 Really Big Press ppg. 152-153

Animal Diversity Web (U. of Michigan) animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Sebastes_caurinus/

Ron’s WordPress Shortlink wp.me/p1DZ4b-Dx

 

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